Chieftain Press

The Flu Season

Source%3A+media.defense.gov%2F2015%2FOct%2F28%2F2001495264%2F670%2F394%2F0%2F151014-F-WV722-010.jpg
Source: media.defense.gov/2015/Oct/28/2001495264/670/394/0/151014-F-WV722-010.jpg

Source: media.defense.gov/2015/Oct/28/2001495264/670/394/0/151014-F-WV722-010.jpg

Source: media.defense.gov/2015/Oct/28/2001495264/670/394/0/151014-F-WV722-010.jpg

Eva Ricci, Chief Editor

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The flu season is here and is hitting the United States hard. Reported to be one of the worst recent seasons on record, the flu seems to be affecting almost everyone. Patients are flooding hospitals and doctor’s offices, causing a surge in vaccine requests. But this year’s flu vaccine doesn’t seem to be working to prevent this unusually strong strain of the flu, known as H3N2.

We are currently approaching peak flu season, as February is the most common month for people to contract the illness. Unlike past years, the CDC reports that the entire United States is experiencing widespread flu activity as of mid-January.

The number of flu-related deaths has been astronomically high for this season and is causing panic among various communities. Schools across the country have closed due to worry over a growing number of student and staff absences each day.

But why is this flu season so much worse than past years? The flu is commonly produced by the Influenza A or B species. Within these species are various strains; some worse than others. This year, the H3N2 virus is a much more difficult flu strain to prevent and vaccinate against. It targets more susceptible populations such as children and the elderly.

Doctors are encouraging those who haven’t yet the received the flu vaccine to do so. But even with the vaccine, many are still susceptible to contracting the flu due to the imperfection of the vaccine. Even so, it is reported that those with the vaccine will have less of a chance of hospitalization and death than those without.

As the flu season is in full swing, it is important to keep your hands clean. Touching commonly used surfaces/objects is a common method of transmission. If you or someone else around you is sick, encourage yourself or them to cover their mouth while they cough or sneeze to prevent further contamination.

This flu season has been one of the worst on recent record and taking preventative measures is important to keep yourself and others around you healthy.

 

Image Source:

www.media.defense.gov/2015/Oct/28/2001495264/670/394/0/151014-F-WV722-010.jpg

 

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The Flu Season